Ted Smith in the article "Fullness of Ordinary Time" contrasts the type of biblical material found in the great cycles of the year and Ordinary Time: 

But while the Ordinary part of Ordinary Time has taken on connotations of the mundane, its first reference is not to commonness but to the numbers that name its days. Ordinary Time is marked by ordinal numbers ...

In contrast, the greater cycles of the year have a stronger sense of narrative time. They drive toward the stable and the empty tomb ...

...The Sundays of Ordinary Time are different. They resist assimilation to the narrative. They are not arranged as a narrative journey to some great end of the story. They are rather, each one, an interruption of narrative, a tearing of time. Because each one is a little Easter, each one declares the end of historical time.

Jan Richardson writes:

We remember that God dwells even in ordinary times and places. We never know when the divine presence may show forth as we about our daily work.